Tuesday3 August 20049:30pm MDT2004-08-04 UTC 0330 back top next  

The Asteroid/Comet Connection's
daily news journal about
asteroids, comets, and meteors

Today's issue status: done

SundayAugustFridayIndex

Cover: Unusual object 2004 NN8 is seen in this July 16th image from John Broughton at Reedy Creek Observatory in southeastern Queensland, Australia. In this three-minute exposure with his 0.51m telescope, north is up and east is left.
      2004 NN8, which may prove to be a comet, is traveling a retrograde path (i=165.4°) counter to the planets and almost all asteroids (see news thread). The MPC shows that, since the 13-16 July discovery arc, 2004 NN8 was reported from the 17th by Wykrota Observatory and was last observed 19-21 July with the Australian National University 1m telescope.

Meteor news – panel 1/1 Major News for 3 August 2004 back top next  
Meteor news

U.K. meteorite search:  Open University has a news release today (MS-Word DOC file, HTML at SpaceRef.com) telling that the university and BBC2's Stardate program “is challenging the public to go out and search for missing meteorites.” Meteorite curator Richard Greenwood, who is quoted as saying that “One of the top places in the world to find meteorites is North America, due to its featureless landscape,” advises that “looking in similar landscapes in the UK could also be lucrative.”

Britain's 20 meteorites have been found in: Glenrothes, Strathmore, Perth, and High Possil in Scotland; Bovedy and Crumlin in Northern Ireland; Pontlyfni and Beddgelert in Wales; and Middlesbrough, Wold Cottage, Appley Bridge, Rowton, Barwell, Glatton, Aldsworth (Cirencester), Ashdon, Launton, Hatford, Danebury and Stretchleigh in England. 

BBC has a report. And a Scottish news site tells that “The sleepy Strathmore Valley . . . area, which runs through Perthshire and Angus, may be home to one of the UK's richest stashes of undiscovered meteorites,” due to a 3 December 1917 event that resulted in known widely separated falls. More pieces could be found, and there may be some already in people's possession that haven't been identified and cataloged.

New Zealand meteors:  New Zealand news outlets told this morning about two separate meteor events. The New Zealand Herald reported that the first (described in another report as at about 1:50am) was seen over the lower island “by pilots from several aircraft” and on the ground “from Hawke's Bay to the upper South Island.” And, in the north, “There was also a report of a meteorite [sic] in Waitakere City around 6.35am.” A TVNZ report about the first meteor has been updated to say “There have been reports from Auckland to Canterbury of meteors being seen early on Tuesday morning.” See also NewstalkZB.

More meteor news:  See an article at Sky & Telescope about “2004: An Excellent Year for the Perseids,” which are predicted to peak a week from now, on 11-12 August.

The New Mexico Quay County Sun reported August 1st that V.J. “Jim” Jordan has donated to Mesalands Community College Dinosaur Museum in Tucumcari a “collection of assorted fossils, coprolites (dinosaur feces), gastrolites, bone pieces, and meteorites.” This is described as including an “exceptional assortment of meteorites [with] a cross section of all the different meteorites of every major class.”

News briefs – panel 1/1 Major News for 3 August 2004 back top next  
News briefs

Mission news:  SpaceRef.com and Space.com are reporting today that the shutdown of classified work at Los Alamos National Lab due to an internal security crisis includes a stoppage in generating the nuclear fuel that will be used to create electrical power for the New Horizons mission to Pluto and the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt. And they say this threatens to move the launch from January 2006 to January 2007, which, due to a cascade of circumstances, would delay the arrival at Pluto by four years. Space.com reports that the 2006 launch is also “in jeopardy” because of launcher and spacecraft development problems.

The Rosetta comet mission has a new status report from yesterday about testing activities during 23-30 July for various systems on the spacecraft, which is now four light minutes from Earth. The navigation camera was turned on for the first time, and a picture it took of the Earth-Moon system was released today.

Risk monitoring - panel 1/1 Major News for 3 August 2004 back top next  
Risk monitoring Sunday 3 August Friday

The Tuesday Daily Orbit Update MPEC (DOU) has observation of 2004 OT11 spanning midnight 1-2 August from Naef Observatory in Switzerland and Monday morning from Powell Observatory in Kansas. Today, Tuesday, NEODyS removed its last impact solutions for this object and JPL is down to one very low-rated solution.

Also of interest in the DOU are July 21st observations by David Tholen's team on Mauna Kea in Hawaii for 2004 NL8, which had its last impact solution removed yesterday.

Summary Risk Table - sources checked at 0327 UTC, 4 Aug

Object

Assessment

Years

VI
PS
cum
PS
max
T
S
Arc 
days
 2004 OT11NEODyS 8/3R E M O V E D
JPL 8/32075-20751-6.17-6.1705.886
 2004 ME6JPL 6/282017-209943-5.64-6.3500.873
 NEODyS 6/272044-20637-7.29-7.7600.873
VI = count of "virtual impactors" (impact solutions)
See A/CC's Consolidated Risk Tables for more and maybe
  newer details, and check the monitors' links for latest info.
Note that only objects recently in view are shown here.

Risk monitoring 2 August

The Monday Daily Orbit Update MPEC (DOU) carried observations of only four unnumbered asteroids, and two of them had impact solutions. 2004 NL8 was reported from Sunday morning from Powell Observatory in Kansas, and on Monday NEODyS eliminated its last impact solution for this kilometer-size object.

The DOU also has observations of 2004 OT11 from Sunday morning from Powell and Sandlot observatories in Kansas and from Francisquito Observatory in southern California. NEODyS and JPL on Monday sharply lowered their risk assessments for this kilometer-size object.

Summary Risk Table - sources checked at 0014 UTC, 3 Aug

Object

Assessment

Years

VI
PS
cum
PS
max
T
S
Arc 
days
 2004 OT11 NEODyS 8/22051-20752-4.60-4.6705.077
JPL 8/22042-20753-4.49-4.6605.077
 2004 NL8NEODyS 8/2R E M O V E D
JPL 7/28R E M O V E D
 2004 ME6JPL 6/282017-209943-5.64-6.3500.873
 NEODyS 6/272044-20637-7.29-7.7600.873
VI = count of "virtual impactors" (impact solutions)
See A/CC's Consolidated Risk Tables for more and maybe
  newer details, and check the monitors' links for latest info.
Note that only objects recently in view are shown here.
http://www.HohmannTransfer.com/mn/0408/03.htm   [ top ]
Publisher information, privacy statement, and disclaimer
The contents and presentation of this page are © Copyright 2004 Columbine, Inc. - All Rights Reserved
Please report broken links or other problems with this page to <webmaster@hohmanntransfer.com>.
Any mentioned trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
Do NOT copy or mirror this page, but you are welcome to link to it. All information here is subject to change.
Individuals may make "snapshot" copies for their own private non-commercial use.
Linking: A/CC's Major News via frame or redirection, via partial mirror frame or redirection, or via news feed or XML/RSS
Bookmarks: A/CC's Major News via frame or redirection –&– via alternate partial mirror site frame or redirection