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CRT Archive for Objects Discovered in 2004 & Earlier

for a few objects of special interest that once appeared on the CRT page
and still have, or recently had, impact solutions

Note: There is nothing more irrelevant to current Earth impact hazard analysis than past impact solutions (also known as VIs--"virtual impactors") for minor objects. Only the most recent VI for an object from a risk monitor has any relevancy, and only until it, too, is supplanted or removed. On the other hand, two objects discovered in 2004 and shown here -- 99942 Apophis (2004 MN4) and 2004 VD17 -- are classic examples of the day-to-day, and now year-to-year, progression of risk analysis for the few objects that may present some future threat to society. Tiny, Earth-buzzing 2004 FU162 is included for its unusual history and for having had impact solutions that are not just past but passed (in early Spring 2006). 2004 RQ252 is an example of the difficulty in recovering small asteroids, even when they should have been in good view on a return visit less than two years after discovery. 2004 XP14 is presented due to interest over its unusually close Earth flyby on 3 July 2006. And 2002 GJ8 and 2004 HZ are good examples of how objects seemingly lost will get picked up in later years to have their impact solutions removed. The other objects on this page were moved here from the old CRT page where they had been sitting when that page was retired on 1 July 2007 -- 2004 BX159, 2004 XN44, and 2004 XY130.


Object index

a = amateur discovery   f = FMOP discovery   r = has impact solution(s)   s = small object (H>22.0)


2004 XY130

Current assessments:  NEODyS [backup] & JPL NEOPO

Diameter:  503 meters (JPL 16 May 2008 estimate)

JPL:  Orbit Viewer     NEODyS:  object home page [backup] & observations [backup]

Circulars:  none public

Notes:  2004 XY130 was posted as an impact risk by JPL on 9 March 2007 with the first impact solution just over 24 months away. This object hasn't appeared in MPECs until an orbit -- but not astrometry -- was published in the March 9th DOU. MPES shows that all observations came from Mauna Kea in Hawaii on 12-14 Dec. 2004. MPES indicates a very slim chance currently to recover this object for observers capable of searching for a dim lost object at low solar elongations, a specialty of David Tholen's team on Mauna Kea. This visibility calculation comes from the MPC's nominal orbit calculation, which is for an object that comes no closer to Earth than about 37 lunar distances. The present risk assessment is highly preliminary, with an observing arc of only 48 hours, and will change when new observations can be made.

NEODyS posted this object on March 10th and in doing so made public the astrometry (see "observations" links immediately above), including a program code showing that this was the work of David Tholen's team.

Packed designation:  K04XD0Y

NEODyS Clomon AssessmentJPL NEOPO Sentry Assessment
16 May 08

Years

VI
PS
Cum
PS
Max
T
S
Arc
Days
Prob
Cum

Diam
2009-210787-2.73-2.8002.0075.0e-070.503

Years

VI
PS
Cum
PS
Max
T
S
Arc
Days
2009-20091-3.64-3.6402.007
10 March 07
9 March 07
2009-209777-3.04-3.1502.0074.4e-070.502

2004 XP14

Current assessment:  NO impact solutions

Diameter:  420 meters (JPL 12 Jan. 2005 estimate)

JPL:  Orbit Viewer     NEODyS:  object home page [backup] & observations [backup]

Circulars:  MPEC 2004-X44

Notes:  2004 XP14 was discovered on 10 Dec. 2004 by LINEAR and announced the next day, which is when JPL posted it with impact solutions. NEODyS posted it on the 12th. On 20 Dec. both risk monitors elevated this object to Torino Scale 1 (a routine alert that an object "merits special monitoring") for an impact solution in 2077, but the following day NEODyS eliminated that solution, which had been its only, and JPL lowered this object to TS-0.

2004 XP14 was noted as being in view until Feb. 23rd, and for awhile was reported as last observed on Jan. 11th. On March 17th, however, observations were published from Mt. John Obs. from the day before, and JPL removed its remaining impact solutions.

2004 XP14 in 2006 is making an unusually close Earth flyby for an object of its size, coming to within 1.13 lunar distances on July 3rd.

Packed designation:  K04X14P

NEODyS Clomon AssessmentJPL NEOPO Sentry Assessment
17 March 05

   Years   

VI
PS
Cum
PS
Max
T
S
Arc
Days
 Prob 
Cum

Diam
R E M O V E D
12 Jan. 05
2082-2102  8-2.69-2.84031.7826.1e-060.420
1 Jan. 05
2086-2102  3-2.97-3.07021.1873.3e-060.420
31 Dec. 04
2098-2102  2-2.91-2.98020.6803.8e-060.420
30 Dec. 04
2098-2102  2-3.29-3.36018.8641.5e-060.430
29 Dec. 04
2098-2102  2-3.21-3.27017.9891.9e-060.420
28 Dec. 04
2098-2102  2-3.51-3.59011.5069.7e-070.420
22 Dec. 04
2077-2102  3-3.54-3.63011.5068.9e-070.420

   Years   

VI
PS
Cum
PS
Max
T
S
Arc
Days
R E M O V E D
21 Dec. 04
2077-2102  2-3.79-3.79010.6425.0e-070.420
2077-2077  1-2.05-2.0518.985
20 Dec. 04
2077-2102  3-2.04-2.041  8.9852.1e-050.420
2077-2077  1-2.91-2.9108.609
19 Dec. 04
2077-2102  2-2.52-2.540  8.6097.0e-060.420
2077-2077  1-2.56-2.5606.954
18 Dec. 04
2077-2077  1-2.52-2.520  6.9547.3e-060.420
2077-2077  1-2.87-2.8706.686
17 Dec. 04
2077-2102  2-2.77-2.780  6.6863.9e-060.420
2077-2077  1-3.26-3.2605.692
16 Dec. 04
2077-2102  2-3.61-3.640  5.6925.6e-070.430
2077-2077  2-2.94-2.9804.594
15 Dec. 04
2072-2102  7-3.14-3.280  4.5941.6e-060.420
2077-2077  2-3.05-3.2803.640
14 Dec. 04
2065-2102  9-3.12-3.190  3.6401.8e-060.420
2018-2065  6-3.57-3.9001.988
13 Dec. 04
2019-210030-3.66-4.070  1.9883.8e-070.430
2018-2077  5-3.12-3.1601.646
12 Dec. 04
2041-210020-4.14-4.600  1.6461.6e-070.430
11 Dec. 04
2006-210474-2.80-2.850  0.9932.3e-070.419

2004 XN44

Current assessment:  NO impact solutions

JPL:  Orbit Viewer     NEODyS:  object home page [backup] & observations [backup]

Circulars:  DOU MPEC 2007-K22

Notes:  From a search, it appears that 2004 XN44 did not appear in MPECs before the DOU MPEC of May 19th this year, which reported its uncredited discovery as coming from an observatory atop Mauna Kea on 13 Dec. 2004. Someone on Mauna Kea followed it the next night, and David Tholen's team observed it the night after that. On May 22nd JPL posted this large, lost object with a first impact solution (later removed) less than 23 months away. NEODyS posted it on June 5th after an additional observation night in 2004 was published. All impact solutions were removed on 7 Aug. 2007 when observations from Tholen's team were published from 15 and 17 Jan. 2005, an observing arc of now 35 days.

Packed designation:  K04X44N

NEODyS Clomon AssessmentJPL NEOPO Sentry Assessment

   Years   

VI
PS
Cum
PS
Max
T
S
Arc
Days
R E M O V E D
7 Aug.

   Years   

VI
PS
Cum
PS
Max
T
S
Arc
Days
 Prob 
Cum

Diam
R E M O V E D
2013-207416-3.15-3.6707.027
9 June
2013-210218-2.93-3.250  7.0272.9e-070.730
2013-207922-2.75-2.9603.022
5 June
2013-209423-3.02-3.250  3.0221.4e-070.740
30 May
2009-2063  9-4.08-4.500  1.9575.3e-090.748
24 May
2009-2063  8-4.10-4.510  1.9574.3e-090.740
22 May
2009-206910-4.06-4.470  1.9575.6e-090.746

144898 2004 VD17

Current assessments:  NEODyS [backup] & JPL NEOPO

Diameter:  580 meters (JPL estimate)

JPL:  Orbit Viewer     NEODyS:  object home page [backup] & observations [backup]

Packed designation:  E4898 (originally K04V17D)

Circulars:  MPECs 2004-V40 & 2005-V96

  [jump to assessment tables]

Notes:  2004 VD17 was discovered on 7 Nov. 2004 by LINEAR in New Mexico and was announced the next day. It was posted with impact solutions at JPL and NEODyS on 9 Nov. when further observations became available. JPL elevated 2004 VD17 to Torino Scale 1 (a routine alert that an object "merits special monitoring") on 22 Nov., and NEODyS put it at TS-1 on the 23rd.

2004 VD17 had been noted to go out of view on 5 Feb. 2005 and wasn't observed after 28 Jan. until David Tholen's team picked it up from Mauna Kea on March 4th, which was published 13 days later.

On 15 Nov. 2005 it was reported that Tholen's team had recovered 2004 VD17 on the 4th, 11th, and 13th of that month using the University of Hawaii 2.2m telescope on Mauna Kea. This more than tripled the object's observation arc, from 117 to 371 days.

2004 VD17 brightened into view in early Feb. 2006 and was picked up with the Spacewatch 1.8m telescope on 6 Feb. It remains in view until around June 22nd, then comes back again in late July for the rest of the year.

On 6 Feb. 2006, for only the second time in risk monitoring history, 2004 VD17 was raised to a Torino Scale rating of 2 (for "a somewhat close but not highly unusual pass near the Earth ... an actual collision is very unlikely"). JPL raised it to TS-2 after the next observations became available on Feb. 23rd.

The DOU MPEC of 12 March 2006 reported three positions from Sergio Foglia, Giuseppe Forti, and Maura Tombelli using archive images from NEAT's Mt. Palomar telescope from 16 Feb. 2002, tripling 2004 VD17's observation arc from 487 to 1,482 days. This data was supplanted in the next DOU MPEC with two positions calculated from the 16 Feb. 2002 archive images, and three positions were added from 14-15 March 2002, all coded as "very faint images." This new data was submitted to the MPC by Rob Matson, who told A/CC that, even though "these five points are pretty self-consistent," they are "basically at the noise floor" for NEAT/Palomar images. Subsequently, the original uncompressed archive images were provided to Matson and Foglia by NEAT to attempt a sure precovery. NEODyS and JPL updated on Matson's data on March 21st, and the new positions were published by the MPC on March 22nd.

On 22-23 May 2006 JPL and NEODyS brought 2004 VD17 back down to Torino Scale 1.

About astrometry, the European Spaceguard Central Node (SCN) first page stated on May 15th, "observations needed with a large telescope (higher astrometric accuracy) in May and June 2016."

2004 VD17 was out of view for ground-based optical telescopes from about June 23rd until around Aug. 5th, and after May was next reported observed in late September, from Catalina Station in Arizona. On 17 Oct. 2006 NEODyS and JPL lowered their Torino Scale ratings for 2004 VD17 to zero ("likelihood of collision is zero, or so low as to be effectively zero") after observation was reported from June 1st. That was from the Spacewatch 1.8m telescope in Arizona, which then went on to report observations from 18, 27, and 28 Oct. NEODyS and JPL on Oct. 29th removed the last single impact solution each had for this object, but posted solutions again a day later.

On 12 Dec. 2006 this object was numbered and is now identified as 144898 2004 VD17, which in formatted MPECs appears as "packed number" E4898.

Magdalena Ridge Observatory (MRO) observed 144898 2004 VD17 on 13 Feb. 2008, following which JPL removed its last impact solution for this object and NEODyS updated its risk assessment.

[ 2004 VD17 top | page top ]

NEODyS Clomon Assessment

Years

VI
PS
Cum
PS
Max
T
S
Arc
Days
2102-21042-4.55-4.5502469.098
27 Nov.
JPL NEOPO Sentry Assessment
2102-21042-4.21-4.2102188.052
14 Feb.

Years

VI
PS
Cum
PS
Max
T
S
Arc
Days
Prob
Cum

Diam
R E M O V E D

2 0 0 7
2102-21043-4.04-4.0401804.039
3 April
2102-21043-3.52-3.5201804.039
26 Jan.
2102-21021-4.91-4.9101804.0001.7e-080.580

2 0 0 6
2102-21042-3.43-3.4301764.893
18 Dec.
2102-21021-4.76-4.7601764.9002.4e-080.580
2102-21042-3.29-3.2901742.962
26 Nov.
2102-21021-3.28-3.2801743.0007.2e-070.580
2102-21042-3.27-3.2701741.975
25 Nov.
2102-21021-3.26-3.2601742.0007.5e-070.580
2102-21042-3.16-3.1601714.939
30 Oct.
2102-21021-3.15-3.1501714.9009.8e-070.580
R E M O V E D
29 Oct.
R E M O V E D
2102-21021-3.09-3.0901713.995
28 Oct.
2102-21021-3.08-3.0801714.0001.1e-060.580
2102-21021-3.03-3.0301705.013
19 Oct.
2102-21021-3.02-3.0201705.0001.3e-060.580
2102-21042-2.97-2.9701684.031
17 Oct.
2102-21021-2.96-2.9601684.0001.5e-060.580
2102-21042-1.96-1.9611684.031
29 Sept.
2102-21021-1.95-1.9511684.0001.5e-050.580
2102-21042-1.94-1.9411557.634
25 May
2102-21021-1.94-1.9411557.6001.6e-050.580
24 May
2102-21021-1.47-1.4711553.7034.7e-050.580
2102-21043-1.48-1.4811553.703
2102-21043-1.04-1.0411553.703
23 May
2102-21021-1.03-1.0311553.7031.3e-040.580
2102-21043-0.44-0.4421534.601
16 May
2102-21021-0.43-0.4321534.6015.1e-040.580
2102-21042-0.40-0.4021534.601
1 May
2102-21042-0.39-0.3921534.6015.6e-040.580
2102-21043-0.39-0.3921532.628
29 April
2102-21021-0.39-0.3921532.6285.6e-040.580
2102-21042-0.37-0.3721530.686
27 April
2102-21042-0.36-0.3621530.6865.9e-040.580
2102-21042-0.32-0.3221526.409
24 April
2102-21021-0.31-0.3121526.4096.7e-040.580
2102-21042-0.30-0.3021520.804
19 April
2102-21021-0.27-0.2721520.8047.3e-040.580
2102-21042-0.32-0.3221520.677
17 April
2102-21021-0.30-0.3021520.6776.9e-040.580
10 April
2102-21021-0.25-0.2521511.5577.6e-040.580
2102-21042-0.26-0.2621511.557
9 April
2102-21042-0.26-0.2621511.557
8 April
2102-21042-0.25-0.2521510.395
7 April
2102-21042-0.23-0.2321507.792
5 April
2102-21021-0.22-0.2221507.7928.3e-040.580
2102-21042-0.34-0.3421506.717
4 April
2102-21021-0.33-0.3321506.7176.5e-040.580
2102-21042-0.35-0.3521505.556
3 April
2102-21021-0.34-0.3421505.5566.3e-040.580
2102-21042-0.35-0.3521504.502
1 April
2102-21042-0.34-0.3421504.5026.2e-040.580
2102-21042-0.36-0.3621501.856
31 March
2102-21042-0.36-0.3621501.856
30 March
2102-21021-0.35-0.3521501.8566.2e-040.580
2102-21043-0.35-0.3521499.799
29 March
2102-21021-0.34-0.3421499.7996.4e-040.580
2102-21042-0.34-0.3421499.799
28 March
2102-21043-0.34-0.3421498.509
26 March
2102-21021-0.33-0.3321498.5096.4e-040.580
2102-21042-0.35-0.3521497.761
25 March
2102-21042-0.32-0.3221496.772
24 March
2102-21021-0.32-0.3221496.7726.6e-040.580
2102-21042-0.32-0.3221495.825
23 March
2102-21021-0.31-0.3121495.8256.7e-040.580
2102-21042-0.34-0.3421493.822
22 March
2102-21021-0.33-0.3321493.8226.3e-040.580
2102-21042-0.39-0.3921492.500
21 March
2102-21021-0.38-0.3821492.5005.6e-040.580
13 March
2102-21042-0.24-0.242  487.0607.8e-040.580
2102-21042-0.25-0.252  487.060
11 March
2102-21042-0.28-0.282  487.060
10 March
2102-21042-0.24-0.242  487.0607.7e-040.580
2102-21043-0.27-0.272  485.930
9 March
2096-21044-0.25-0.252  485.9307.7e-040.580
2102-21044-0.27-0.272  483.900
7 March
2096-21043-0.25-0.252  483.9007.6e-040.580
2102-21044-0.28-0.282482.965
6 March
2096-21044-0.26-0.262482.9707.5e-040.580
2102-21043-0.29-0.292480.080
3 March
2102-21042-0.28-0.282480.0807.1e-040.580
27 Feb.
2102-21042-0.33-0.332475.0506.4e-040.580
2089-21046-0.33-0.332475.050
26 Feb.
2096-21047-0.38-0.382472.040
23 Feb.
2096-21044-0.40-0.402472.0405.4e-040.580
2096-21047-0.55-0.552456.170
7 Feb.
2096-21043-0.57-0.571456.1703.6e-040.580

2 0 0 5
2096-21047-0.69-0.701371.220
16 Nov.
2102-21042-0.64-0.641371.2203.1e-040.580
2096-2104    5-0.93-0.941371.220
15 Nov.
2096-2104    3-0.97-0.971371.2201.4e-040.580
2091-2100    7-1.12-1.361116.950
17 March
2091-2104    5-1.06-1.131116.9501.1e-040.580
2091-2104    8-1.11-1.511116.9509.5e-050.580
2080-2100    6-0.93-1.031  81.716
5 March
2091-2100    7-0.94-1.041  81.716
28 Jan.
2091-2104    9-0.97-1.161  81.7161.3e-040.580
2091-2100    7-1.06-1.181  79.720
26 Jan.
2091-2104    7-1.10-1.271  79.7209.5e-050.580
2091-2100    7-1.20-1.341  71.795
20 Jan.
2091-2104    9-1.14-1.401  71.7959.0e-050.580
19 Jan.
2091-2102    8-1.10-1.331  69.8209.7e-050.580
2080-2100    6-1.15-1.271  69.820
17 Jan.
2091-2100    6-1.15-1.261  69.389
16 Jan.
2091-2104    9-1.10-1.241  69.3899.7e-050.580
2086-2100    8-0.90-0.961  68.797
15 Jan.
2091-2104  10-0.85-0.941  68.7971.7e-040.580
2091-2100    7-1.17-1.261  66.851
14 Jan.
2091-2104    8-1.12-1.241  66.8519.2e-050.580
2091-2100    6-1.38-1.471  66.518
13 Jan.
2091-2104    9-1.32-1.451  66.5185.9e-050.580
2086-2100    6-1.23-1.301  64.781
12 Jan.
2091-2104    8-1.17-1.271  64.7818.2e-050.580
2091-2100    4-1.48-1.571  64.722
11 Jan.
2091-2104    9-1.42-1.541  64.7224.6e-050.580
2086-2100    6-1.24-1.301  61.564
8 Jan.
2074-2104  10-1.19-1.281  61.5647.9e-050.580
2086-2100    6-1.27-1.321  59.461
7 Jan.
2074-2104  11-1.13-1.201  59.4619.1e-050.580
2091-2100    5-1.25-1.311  59.461
6 Jan.
2074-2104  10-1.12-1.201  59.4619.3e-050.580
2091-2100    4-1.37-1.431  58.570
5 Jan.
2074-2104  10-1.28-1.361  58.5706.5e-050.580
2091-2100    5-1.46-1.511  57.436
4 Jan.
2074-2104    9-1.36-1.441  57.4365.4e-050.580
2091-2098    5-1.23-1.271  56.523
3 Jan.
2074-2104    9-1.15-1.211  56.5238.7e-050.580
2080-2100    5-1.53-1.581  55.532
2 Jan.

2 0 0 4
2091-2100    6-1.67-1.721  53.779
31 Dec.
2074-2104    8-1.58-1.641  53.7793.2e-050.580
2082-2093    6-2.10-2.161  51.698
29 Dec.
2074-2102    6-1.99-2.071  51.6981.2e-050.580
2082-2100  12-2.25-2.411  50.525
28 Dec.
2074-2102  10-2.18-2.301  50.5258.0e-060.580
2062-2100  26-1.36-1.391  44.498
22 Dec.
2062-2104  14-1.31-1.351  44.4985.9e-050.580
2062-2097  18-1.35-1.381  42.468
20 Dec.
2062-2102  12-1.30-1.341  42.4686.1e-050.580
2062-2096  19-1.30-1.331  41.797
19 Dec.
2074-2104  14-1.26-1.301  41.7976.7e-050.580
2062-2099  23-1.31-1.341  40.515
2062-2100  19-1.28-1.311  38.815
18 Dec.
2062-2102  16-1.27-1.311  40.5156.6e-050.580
2062-2100  18-1.12-1.151  39.135
17 Dec.
2062-2102  13-1.26-1.301  38.8156.7e-050.580
2062-2100  20-1.29-1.321  38.815
16 Dec.
2062-2102  14-1.30-1.341  38.8156.1e-050.580
2074-2100  23-1.38-1.421  37.477
15 Dec.
2062-2102  13-1.38-1.431  37.4775.1e-050.580
2062-2100  22-1.37-1.421  36.504
14 Dec.
2074-2102  11-1.39-1.451  36.5045.0e-050.580
2062-2100  24-1.32-1.381  35.504
13 Dec.
2062-2102  14-1.34-1.401  35.5045.7e-050.580
2062-2098  23-1.33-1.401  34.578
12 Dec.
2062-2102  15-1.32-1.391  34.5785.9e-050.580
2062-2100  23-1.34-1.421  33.820
11 Dec.
2062-2102  13-1.36-1.451  33.8205.5e-050.570
2062-2095  19-1.38-1.501  32.549
10 Dec.
2074-2104  16-1.39-1.511  32.5495.1e-050.580
2074-2100  16-1.47-1.651  31.646
9 Dec.
2074-2102  15-1.45-1.641  31.6464.5e-050.570
2062-2100  18-1.37-1.511  30.548
8 Dec.
2062-2102  17-1.36-1.511  30.5485.5e-050.570
2074-2097  17-1.32-1.441  29.512
7 Dec.
2062-2102  14-1.35-1.491  29.5125.7e-050.570
2062-2100  18-1.38-1.531  28.793
6 Dec.
2062-2102  14-1.37-1.521  28.7935.3e-050.570
2062-2102  13-1.39-1.541  27.5785.1e-050.570
2062-2095  12-1.39-1.541  27.578
5 Dec.
2062-2098  19-1.46-1.631  25.961
4 Dec.
2074-2102  13-1.45-1.621  25.9614.4e-050.580
2074-2100  14-1.50-1.681  25.733
3 Dec.
2062-2102  12-1.49-1.671  25.7334.0e-050.580
2060-2095  16-1.60-1.801  24.559
2 Dec.
2062-2102  14-1.61-1.821  24.5593.0e-050.580
2075-2098  15-1.66-1.861  23.652
1 Dec.
2074-2102  10-1.66-1.861  23.6522.6e-050.590
2058-2097  18-1.77-1.981  22.717
30 Nov.
2062-2102  12-1.77-1.981  22.7172.0e-050.590
2036-2095  19-1.82-2.031  20.896
29 Nov.
2036-2102  14-1.84-2.061  20.8961.7e-050.590
2062-2102  14-1.95-2.171  20.0381.3e-050.590
2036-2095  31-1.93-2.181  20.038
28 Nov.
2036-2098  31-1.93-2.181  18.718
26 Nov.
2036-2102  17-1.93-2.181  18.7181.3e-050.590
2036-2096  27-1.85-2.121  16.608
25 Nov.
2036-2100  18-1.85-2.111  16.6081.6e-050.600
2036-2100  31-1.90-2.171  15.910
24 Nov.
2036-2102  19-1.89-2.161  15.9101.5e-050.600
2036-2099  29-1.88-2.211  15.823
23 Nov.
2036-2100  19-1.88-2.201  15.8231.4e-050.601
2036-2079  10-2.88-3.160  14.225
22 Nov.
2036-2102  20-1.91-2.231  14.2251.3e-050.600
2036-2077  15-2.70-3.170  13.773
21 Nov.
2036-2079  12-2.55-2.970  11.514
20 Nov.
2036-2095  20-2.23-2.770  11.5145.4e-060.603
2036-2079  12-2.63-3.040  11.042
19 Nov.
2036-2095  20-2.22-2.770  10.9245.5e-060.603
2036-2079  14-2.57-3.170  10.855
18 Nov.
2036-2095  22-2.21-2.720  10.8555.9e-060.608
2036-2079  15-2.67-3.110    9.800
17 Nov.
2036-2100  25-2.13-2.640    9.8007.0e-060.611
2054-2079  17-2.90-3.240    8.580
16 Nov.
2036-2100  26-2.14-2.660    8.5807.5e-060.600
2058-2079  11-2.95-3.220    7.497
15 Nov.
2051-2097  28-2.22-2.820    7.4976.1e-060.600
2036-2079  22-2.58-3.100    6.817
14 Nov.
2036-2102  39-2.15-2.770    6.8176.7e-060.603
2036-2079  24-2.66-3.260    5.680
13 Nov.
2036-2097  32-2.14-2.750    5.6806.8e-060.612
2043-2079  28-2.29-2.580    3.700
12 Nov.
2042-2101  54-2.03-2.570    3.7008.7e-060.611
2042-2079  25-2.32-2.640    3.700
11 Nov.
2042-2099  67-1.83-2.590    3.7001.5e-050.610
2035-2080  46-2.32-2.870    2.379
10 Nov.
2035-2102126-1.80-2.750    2.3791.4e-050.634
2026-2080143-2.23-2.960    1.633
9 Nov.
2026-2102231-1.74-2.820    1.6331.6e-050.621

2004 RQ252

Current assessment:  NEODyS [backup]

JPL:  Orbit Viewer     NEODyS:  object home page [backup] & observations [backup]

Circulars:  MPEC 2004-S05

Notes:  2004 RQ252 was discovered by the Siding Spring Survey on 15 Sept. 2004 and announced the next day. It was posted on 16 Sept. by JPL with impact solutions, and NEODyS posted it on the 17th. Both risk monitors removed it on the 20th, but NEODyS reposted it on Sept. 25th, and JPL on the 28th. And on Oct. 3rd, when the first observations since Sept. 26th became available, both risk monitors again removed all impact solutions. However NEODyS reposted it again on Oct. 4th, 2004.

In the year 2006, 2004 RQ252 was calculated to be back in view for most NEO observers, but has not been reported observed. The Spaceguard Central Node's observing campaign's first page dated April 21st (removed by June 7th) said that it was a "unique recovery opportunity (!) at magnitude 21.0 V. Its sky uncertainty ranges from 34' (max brightness at the end of April) to 20' when it will fade to magnitude 22.0 around the end of May. Large facilities with wide-field of view should make this recovery not difficult."

Packed designation:  K04RP2Q

NEODyS Clomon AssessmentJPL NEOPO Sentry Assessment

Years

VI
PS
Cum
PS
Max
T
S
Arc
Days
2017-2017  1-6.92-6.92022.778
13 Oct. 04
2031-2064  2-6.65-6.71022.775
10 Oct. 04
2017-2055  3-6.42-6.52021.791
8 Oct. 04
2064-2064  1-6.40-6.40017.911
4 Oct. 04
R E M O V E D
3 Oct. 04

   Years   

VI
PS
Cum
PS
Max
T
S
Arc
Days
 Prob 
Cum

Diam
R E M O V E D
2031-2064  4-5.51-5.58011.005
28 Sept. 04
2046-2046  1-6.56-6.56011.0051.2e-080.120
2031-2055  2-5.63-5.630  6.009
25 Sept. 04
R E M O V E D
20 Sept. 04
R E M O V E D
2012-2012  1-5.32-5.320  3.051
19 Sept. 04
2012-2019  4-4.92-4.950  3.0519.9e-080.120
2012-2031  4-2.57-2.570  1.840
18 Sept. 04
2012-2025  5-2.57-2.570  1.8402.2e-050.120
2012-206416-2.56-2.590  1.162
17 Sept. 04
16 Sept. 04
2012-207025-2.56-2.580  1.1622.4e-050.120

99942 Apophis (2004 MN4)

Current assessments:  NEODyS [backup] & JPL NEOPO

Diameter:  270 meters (JPL 16 May 2008 estimate)

JPL:  Orbit Viewer     NEODyS:  object home page [backup] & observations [backup]

Packed designation:  99942 (originally K04M04N)

Circulars:  MPECs 2004-Y25, 2004-Y60, 2004-Y63, 2004-Y64, 2004-Y66, 2004-Y68, 2004-Y69, 2004-Y70 & 2004-Y71

  [jump to assessment tables]

Notes:  2004 MN4 was discovered on 19 June 2004 by the team of Roy Tucker, David Tholen, and Fabrizio Bernardi, with Roy Tucker at the 90" Bok Telescope at Kitt Peak in Arizona. It was designated 2004 MN4 at the time, but a discovery MPEC was not issued. This object was rediscovered on 18 Dec. by Gordon Garradd at the Siding Spring Survey (SSS) and it received its first MPEC, 2004-Y25, on the 20th.

After the next observations became available, from SSS on the 22nd, both JPL and NEODyS posted 2004 MN4 with the first-ever Torino Scale 2 rating ("merits concern" for "A somewhat close, but not unusual encounter. Collision is very unlikely."). The next day NEODyS and JPL raised their ratings to yet another unprecedented level — TS-4 ("merits concern" for "A close encounter, with 1% or greater chance of a collision capable of causing regional devastation"). From the 24th forward, both risk monitors also had sets of several impact solutions rated at TS-1 (a routine alert for "merits special monitoring").

On 27 Dec. 2004 it was reported in MPEC 2004-Y70 that 2004 MN4 had been found in images from the Spacewatch 0.9m telescope from March 15th, extending this object's observing arc by a very significant 96.060 days.

Very early on 28 Dec. UT, NEODyS eliminated solutions earlier than 2044 and lowered its overall assessment to TS-1. And JPL soon revised its assessment also to TS-1. On several occasions since going to TS-1, JPL or NEODyS have put out assessments that went to TS-0 (not shown in the compiled risk tables) but were later corrected to TS-1.

2004 MN4 was observed by radar from Arecibo in Puerto Rico on 27, 29, and 30 Jan. and 7 Aug. 2005.

2004 MN4 was numbered 99942 2004 MN4 on 24 June 2005 and 99942 2004 MN4 on 19 July 2005 was named 99942 Apophis after the Greek name for the ancient Egyptian's Apep, god or demon of darkness, chaos, and destruction.

JPL on 5 Aug. 2006 (still the 4th in Pasadena) lowered its 99942 Apophis risk assessment Torino Scale rating to TS-0 ("likelihood of collision is zero, or so low as to be effectively zero"). NEODyS lowered its rating to TS-0 on Sept. 1st.

About astrometry, the Spaceguard Central Node's observing campaign's first page dated April 21st says, "Optical observations not very useful before the apparition in 2013." It was observed again by radar from Arecibo on 6 May 2006, which was reflected in risk assessment updates on May 18th. Optical observations were occasionally reported during January to October of 2006, after which there were none, although 99942 Apophis was calculated to be in view for ground-based telescopes until May of 2007. It next came into (limited) view in late 2007.

Resources (newest first)

  • JPL summary, "Predicting Apophis' Earth Encounters in 2029 and 2036," with new information and analysis based on radar data, Oct. 2007
  • JPL statement, "Radar Observations Refine the Future Motion of Asteroid 2004 MN4," 3 Feb. 2005
  • NEODyS statement, "Near-Earth Asteroid 2004 MN4: current status," 2 Feb. 2005
  • JPL statement, "Possibility of an Earth Impact in 2029 Ruled Out for Asteroid 2004 MN4," 27 Dec. 2004
  • JPL statement, "Near-Earth Asteroid 2004 MN4 Reaches Highest Score To Date On Hazard Scale," issued 23 Dec., updated on the 24th
  • Roy Tucker's 1 July 2004 article, "A sweet position," about the observing run in which 2004 MN4 was first discovered, although not mentioned in the article

News coverage (newest first)

[ 2004 MN4 top | page top ]

NEODyS Clomon AssessmentJPL NEOPO Sentry Assessment
16 May
2008

Years

VI
PS
Cum
PS
Max
T
S
Arc
Days
Prob
Cum

Diam
2036-20693-2.41-2.420884.5192.3e-050.270

2 0 0 6

Years

VI
PS
Cum
PS
Max
T
S
Arc
Days
2036-2076  7-2.56-2.570884.519
21 Oct.
20 Oct.
2036-20372-2.52-2.520884.5192.2e-050.250
2036-2076  7-2.29-2.300884.519
1 Sept.
2036-20372-2.25-2.250884.5192.2e-050.320
2036-2077  8-2.23-2.241864.506
5 Aug.
2036-20543-2.24-2.250864.5062.3e-050.320
31 July
2036-20594-2.20-2.201864.5062.5e-050.320
2036-2077  6-2.18-2.191864.506
30 July
2036-2077  7-2.17-2.191809.494
6 June
2036-20563-2.19-2.191809.4942.6e-050.320
2036-2069  6-2.06-2.081809.494
4 June
2036-2069  6-2.04-2.051782.430
24 May
2036-20692-2.05-2.051782.4303.6e-050.320
2036-2069  6-1.97-1.981782.430
18 May
2036-20682-1.96-1.971782.4304.4e-050.320
2036-207812-1.41-1.411741.404
17 April
2036-206910-1.40-1.401740.404
14 April
2036-20544-1.39-1.391740.4041.6e-040.320
2036-208013-1.38-1.381683.404
1 March
2036-20543-1.37-1.381683.4041.7e-040.320
2036-207412-1.39-1.391681.350
15 Feb.
2036-20624-1.38-1.381681.3501.7e-040.320
2036-2053  5-1.15-1.151656.420
9 Jan.
2036-20372-1.39-1.391656.4201.6e-040.320

2 0 0 5
2036-2074  8-1.14-1.141632.340
23 Dec.
22 Dec.
2036-20693-1.37-1.371632.3401.7e-040.320
2036-2072  8-1.18-1.181632.340
21 Dec.
1 Nov.
2036-2054  3-1.35-1.351593.4101.8e-040.320
2036-2055  5-1.20-1.201593.410
30 Oct.
19 Oct.
2036-2056  4-1.35-1.351571.3901.8e-040.320
2036-2069  6-1.18-1.181571.390
11 Oct.
2036-2069  5-1.18-1.181538.530
12 Sept.
2036-2036  1-1.35-1.351538.5301.8e-040.320
20 Aug.
2036-2056  4-1.35-1.351510.6101.8e-040.320
2036-2072  5-1.19-1.191483.068
19 Aug.
2036-2037  2-1.35-1.351510.6101.8e-040.320
2035-207717-1.05-1.161483.070
31 July
2035-2046  4-1.43-1.521483.0701.5e-040.320
2034-207721-1.09-1.351459.060
27 July
8 July
2034-2055  9-1.43-1.691459.0601.6e-040.320
27 June
2034-2055  9-1.45-1.781448.0501.5e-040.320
2034-206215-1.10-1.361459.060
18 June
2034-207522-1.08-1.371458.765
17 June
15 June
2034-2055  9-1.45-1.781448.0501.5e-040.320
2034-206520-1.07-1.391453.768
12 June
2034-207721-1.09-1.391448.050
9 June
2034-207623-1.10-1.381443.069
1 June
2034-207420-1.10-1.371438.760
30 May
2034-2054  8-1.47-1.861438.7601.4e-040.320
2034-206518-1.07-1.411438.762
28 May
2034-206215-1.08-1.421438.034
27 May
23 May
2034-2055  8-1.47-1.751432.0601.4e-040.320
2034-207419-1.07-1.391432.060
22 May
2034-207720-1.05-1.381416.744
6 May
4 May
2034-2065  9-1.44-1.751411.7701.5e-040.320
2034-206920-1.06-1.371411.770
2 May
2034-206917-1.05-1.371409.733
29 April
2034-207221-1.05-1.391389.010
27 April
2034-207216-1.06-1.391389.010
14 April
2034-206520-1.07-1.411389.010
13 April
2034-205510-1.45-1.781389.0101.5e-040.320
2034-207417-1.06-1.421389.013
11 April
2034-207518-1.06-1.411389.013
9 April
29 March
2034-2055  9-1.45-1.781376.7301.5e-040.320
2034-206918-1.05-1.411376.730
27 March
8 March
2034-2055  9-1.44-1.771354.7301.6e-040.320
2034-207220-1.07-1.391354.730
6 March
2034-206918-1.05-1.391352.737
4 March
2034-206517-1.08-1.341350.717
1 March
2034-206916-1.11-1.411349.735
28 Feb.
2034-206416-1.10-1.401347.675
26 Feb.
2034-206512-1.09-1.351346.958
25 Feb.
2034-205916-1.10-1.361345.176
24 Feb.
2034-207418-1.10-1.361343.952
23 Feb.
2034-2055  8-1.44-1.721342.7101.5e-040.320
2034-207019-1.08-1.321342.710
21 Feb.
2034-206516-1.07-1.311340.739
19 Feb.
2034-206618-1.08-1.311338.104
17 Feb.
2034-206916-1.08-1.311334.035
13 Feb.
2034-206919-1.07-1.301333.706
12 Feb.
2034-207716-1.09-1.311331.871
11 Feb.
2034-207715-1.07-1.301331.871
10 Feb.
2034-2054  8-1.43-1.721330.7101.6e-040.320
2034-206819-1.07-1.291330.710
9 Feb.
2034-207918-1.09-1.311329.714
8 Feb.
2034-206919-1.09-1.321328.724
7 Feb.
2034-207720-1.08-1.301327.683
6 Feb.
2034-206822-1.08-1.311326.013
5 Feb.
2034-206516-1.11-1.331323.760
4 Feb.
2034-2054  9-1.44-1.741323.7601.6e-040.320
2034-207414-1.05-1.381323.755
3 Feb.
2034-2055  8-1.45-1.801323.6401.6e-040.320
2034-2055  8-1.02-1.371323.6401.6e-040.480
2034-206516-1.05-1.381323.640
2 Feb.
2035-2054  7-1.04-1.381323.6401.5e-040.480
2044-207931-1.57-1.881322.008
31 Jan.
2044-208027-1.57-1.831320.710
30 Jan.
2044-210325-1.58-1.831320.7106.9e-050.480
2044-208033-1.58-1.851319.980
29 Jan.
2044-210325-1.58-1.841319.9806.8e-050.480
2044-207929-1.57-1.841314.960
26 Jan.
2044-210326-1.57-1.831314.9607.2e-050.480
2044-208027-1.52-1.831314.960
25 Jan.
2044-210426-1.57-1.821314.9607.1e-050.480
2044-207929-1.53-1.861313.740
23 Jan.
2044-210428-1.58-1.851313.7407.0e-050.480
2044-208034-1.56-1.861312.010
22 Jan.
2044-210223-1.58-1.851312.0106.8e-050.480
2044-208035-1.53-1.891310.920
21 Jan.
2044-210319-1.61-1.881310.9206.2e-050.480
2044-208039-1.55-1.891310.920
20 Jan.
2044-210321-1.60-1.881310.9206.4e-050.480
2044-207927-1.58-1.881308.000
19 Jan.
2044-210325-1.60-1.861309.0006.5e-050.480
2044-208032-1.55-1.871307.061
17 Jan.
2044-208031-1.56-1.871306.680
16 Jan.
2044-210324-1.59-1.861306.6806.7e-050.480
2044-208034-1.59-1.871306.020
15 Jan.
2044-210428-1.62-1.841306.0207.0e-050.470
2044-207926-1.66-1.851304.730
14 Jan.
2044-210324-1.65-1.831304.7306.5e-050.470
2044-207925-1.60-1.851303.740
13 Jan.
2044-207930-1.68-1.861302.870
12 Jan.
2044-208030-1.66-1.861301.670
11 Jan.
2044-2103  9-1.76-1.831301.6705.0e-050.470
2044-208026-1.73-1.891299.662
9 Jan.
2044-207928-1.76-1.901298.820
8 Jan.
2044-210311-1.83-1.891298.8204.7e-050.450
2044-208026-1.75-1.901297.960
7 Jan.
2044-2103  7-1.83-1.881297.9604.8e-050.450
2044-208029-1.76-1.921296.980
6 Jan.
2044-210312-1.84-1.901296.9804.7e-050.450
2044-207919-1.51-1.651295.690
5 Jan.
2044-210311-1.88-1.911295.6904.2e-050.440
2044-207925-1.51-1.661294.704
4 Jan.
2044-208023-1.56-1.671293.740
3 Jan.
2044-210316-1.83-1.931293.7405.2e-050.430
2044-207929-1.51-1.681292.720
2 Jan.
2044-210416-1.83-1.941292.7205.5e-050.430
2044-207927-1.60-1.701290.970
1 Jan.
2044-210320-1.85-1.971290.9705.5e-050.420

2 0 0 4
2044-208029-1.57-1.701290.970
31 Dec.
2044-210317-1.85-1.971290.9705.5e-050.420
2044-207926-1.59-1.711289.330
30 Dec.
2044-207910-1.97-1.981289.3303.8e-050.420
2044-208026-1.58-1.731288.920
29 Dec.
2044-2087  4-2.00-2.001288.9203.7e-050.410
2053-2103  5-1.99-2.011287.7103.9e-050.410
2044-208029-1.43-1.731287.990
2044-207926-1.47-1.781287.660
28 Dec.
2030-208110-1.83-2.111287.9904.2e-050.450
2030-2103  8-1.86-2.111287.7103.8e-050.450
2037-2096  9-1.89-2.161287.6604.1e-050.430
2029-207664 1.07 1.074190.910
27 Dec.
2029-2079411.101.104190.9102.7e-020.390
2029-208068 0.99 0.984189.970
26 Dec.
2029-2092441.011.004189.9702.2e-020.380
2029-207958 1.02 1.024189.020
2029-207945 1.03 1.034188.970
25 Dec.
2029-2079381.031.034189.0202.2e-020.390
2029-2081351.051.054188.9702.4e-020.390
2029-208049 1.01 1.014187.910
24 Dec.
2029-2079341.021.024187.9101.6e-020.440
2029-207454 0.65 0.652187.360
2029-207043 0.42 0.422186.300
23 Dec.
2029-2079280.390.392187.3604.3e-030.420
2029-2067290.240.232186.3003.4e-030.400

2004 HZ

Current assessment:  NO impact solutions

Diameter:  120 meters (JPL 18 May 2004 estimate)

JPL:  Orbit Viewer     NEODyS:  object home page [backup] & observations [backup]

Circulars:  MPEC 2004-H34

Notes:  2004 HZ was discovered on 19 April 2004 by LINEAR and announced the next day, which is when it was posted by JPL as a risk. NEODyS posted it on the 21st and removed it on May 14th. It went out of view for most observers around May 7th, the day it was last reported seen (from Mauna Kea).

On 12 April 2007 it was reported that 2004 HZ had been rediscovered the day before by Spacewatch with its 0.9m telescope and JPL removed its last impact solution for this object.

Packed designation:  K04H00Z

NEODyS Clomon AssessmentJPL NEOPO Sentry Assessment
12 April

   Years   

VI
PS
Cum
PS
Max
T
S
Arc
Days
 Prob 
Cum

Diam
R E M O V E D
18 May 04
2023-2023    1-5.27-5.27018.1149.1e-080.120

   Years   

VI
PS
Cum
PS
Max
T
S
Arc
Days
R E M O V E D
14 May 04
2023-2023    1-4.69-4.69018.1143.5e-070.120
2023-2045    4-2.39-2.39011.973
2 May 04
2023-2033    3-2.44-2.44011.9736.0e-050.120
2023-2045    6-2.42-2.43010.687
1 May 04
2023-2033    3-2.48-2.48010.6875.2e-050.120
2023-2076  17-2.61-2.650  6.672
26 April 04
2023-2064  10-2.68-2.720  6.6723.4e-050.120
2020-2077  29-2.61-2.720  5.721
25 April 04
2023-2091  21-2.67-2.780  5.7213.6e-050.127
2020-2077  53-2.88-3.100  4.797
24 April 04
2023-2087  44-2.79-3.000  4.7972.9e-050.130
2017-2080116-3.26-3.620  2.991
23 April 04
2017-2087  61-3.42-3.700  2.9917.4e-060.130
2008-2077  78-4.49-5.070  1.039
21 April 04
2008-2101132-4.69-5.100  1.0392.5e-070.131
20 April 04
2007-2102486-3.69-4.090  1.0392.0e-060.120

2004 FU162

Current assessment:  JPL NEOPO

Diameter:  6 meters (JPL 16 May 2008 estimate)

JPL:  Orbit Viewer     NEODyS:  object home page [backup] & observations [backup]

Circulars:  MPEC 2004-Q22

Notes:  2004 FU162 was observed for only 44 minutes by LINEAR early on 31 March 2004, and was announced on 22 Aug. 2004 under special circumstances related to its unusually close Earth encounter (see A/CC's special report 22 Aug.). It was posted by JPL on 23 Aug. with many low-rated "impact" solutions, but it must be emphasized that its tiny size means that, if it did enter Earth's atmosphere, it would destruct harmlessly at high altitude.

With no hope for a planned recovery, some of this object's impact solutions have been removed by null result, beginning with two that JPL removed on 1 April 2006 for VIs that day and the day before. More solutions were similarly removed on 1 April 2007 and 26 April 2008 after VIs passed without result.

Packed designation:  K04FG2U


JPL NEOPO Sentry Assessment
16 May 08

Years

VI
PS
Cum
PS
Max
T
S
Arc
Days
Prob
Cum

Diam
2009-2108963-5.08-5.6600.0316.4e-050.006

26 April 08
2009-2104820-5.43-6.3700.0316.2e-050.006

2 April 07
2008-2104821-5.41-6.3700.0316.2e-050.006
1 April 06
2007-2104822-5.41-6.3700.0316.2e-050.006
24 Aug. 04
2006-2104824-5.38-6.3700.0316.5e-050.006
23 Aug. 04
2006-2104818-5.39-6.3700.0316.3e-050.006

2004 BX159

Current assessment:  JPL NEOPO

Diameter:  1.2 km. = 0.745 mile (JPL 16 May 2008 estimate)

JPL:  Orbit Viewer     NEODyS:  object home page [backup] & observations [backup]

Packed designation:  K04BF9X

Circulars:  none public

  [jump to assessment table]

Notes:  2004 BX159 was posted as an impact risk by JPL on 14 Feb. 2007, which presented a bit of a mystery since apparently no astrometry has been made public for this kilometer-size object. The Minor Planet Ephemeris Service (MPES) shows that 2004 BX159 was discovered by unidentified astronomers at the European Southern Observatory on Cerro Paranal in Chile on 20 Jan. 2004, with two positions taken each night from the 20th to 23rd. An orbit was published in the DOU MPEC of 20 Aug. 2004, but, as far as A/CC can find, the observational data isn't available to the public, not via MPEC nor via NEODyS or AstDyS.

This may be embargoed data, which the Minor Planet Center (MPC) accepts from professional astronomers who use large telescopes to observe distant minor objects and who operate differently from those engaged in the discovery and tracking of potentially hazardous objects where openness and quick response are paramount. Or it may just be the kind of astrometric data that doesn't get published in MPECs, such as observations of Main Belt asteroids, and which may take awhile to appear in the AstDyS database.

The MPC's own risk analysis has an orbit calculation for 2004 BX159 that is far from hazardous, but JPL since Feb. 14th has been showing that it cannot rule out orbit solutions that intersect with Earth in August 2009 and in later years. This risk assessment is based on very little data and will, of course, change with more observations, when more observations can be made. Based on the MPC's nominal, non-hazardous orbit calculation, MPES indicates that this object had a slim recovery opportunity in mid-January, a month before it came to the attention of NEO observers, and that there is some possibility it can still be caught if a concerted effort is made now using larger telescopes through maybe June and again beginning in November. The next best opportunity is indicated for next January and continuing through early December 2008, brightening to perhaps magnitude V=19.4 in mid-April, which may be good enough for accidental, if not planned, recovery. Otherwise, MPES indicates that 2004 BX159 won't be next visible even for larger telescopes until around the time of JPL's first impact solution in 2009. Again, this viewability prediction comes from the MPC's nominal orbit calculation, which has 2004 BX159's Earth MOID (minimum orbit intersection distance) at more than 190 lunar distances. JPL's own nominal orbit calculation classifies this object as not being a near-Earth object. Ephemerides for 2004 BX159 based on JPL's Earth-intersecting orbit calculations do not appear to be readily available.

[ 2004 BX159 top | page top ]


JPL NEOPO Sentry Assessment
16 May 08

Years

VI
PS
Cum
PS
Max
T
S
Arc
Days
Prob
Cum

Diam
2009-210014-3.79-3.9403.0083.6e-091.200
14 Feb. 07
2009-210014-3.57-3.6603.0083.6e-091.200

2002 GJ8

Current assessment:  NO impact solutions

Diameter:  460 meters (JPL 19 June 2006 estimate)

JPL:  Orbit Viewer     NEODyS:  object home page [backup] & observations [backup]

Circulars:  MPEC 2002-G62

Notes:  2002 GJ8 was discovered on 12 April 2002 by JPL's NEAT program using its Mt. Palomar telescope. Six days later it debuted on both the JPL and NEODyS risk pages, and was removed by NEODyS on 22 April and by JPL on 4 May 2002. Until the DOU MPEC of 16 April 2007 with recovery observations from the Spacewatch 1.8m telescope two days before, 2002 GJ8 had been last reported observed on 14 May 2002, by Powell Observatory.

JPL reposted this object on 20 May 2004, based on the existing data, and revised its assessment on Nov. 11th of that year. On 19 June 2006 "precovery" observations of 2002 GJ8 from the NEAT archive from its Air Force telescope on Haleakala in Hawaii from 23 March 2002 were reported by the Italian archive-hunting team of Sergio Foglia, Giuseppe Forti, and Maura Tombelli. This added 19.807 days to 2002 GJ8's previous 31.905-day observation arc.

JPL's revised risk estimate at that time put 2002 GJ8's diameter at roughly 460 meters and had a single low-rated impact solution in 2089. According to NEODyS, 2002 GJ8 plays tag with both Earth and Jupiter.

Packed designation:  K02G08J


http://www.HohmannTransfer.com/news/crt04obj.htm - updated 4 Jan. 2009 rev. 0
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